Research Plan

Assessment Task 4:  Research Plan.

Port Arthur
Rainbow over Port Arthur Mar 2018

Above Image: Port Arthur 2018

Introduction:

My great-great-great-uncle William PARKER (No. 1 on pedigree chart), was transported to Van Diemen’s Land in 1835. The same year his father John, and brothers, Ambrose and John arrived in New South Wales as convicts. His brother Thomas, was also sentenced and transported to Van Diemen’s Land in 1841.  I have evidence that Ambrose and Thomas worked together, and are both buried at a property called ‘Jerula‘, in Cowra, New South Wales. His other brother, John, my great-great-grandfather, lived and died at Cowra and married at Carcoar, New South Wales. (Refer family group sheet).

 

Main Research Question:

What happened to William PARKER after his release?

  1. Did he reunite with his father and three siblings?
  2. Did he marry and have children?
  3. Where did he die?

 

Records and Resources I Have Used to Date:

  • I have found William PARKER’s convict records, and this tells me about his prison term and that he became a free man via Conditional Pardon on 20 September 1845[1].
  • I have my great-great grandfather’s convict records stating that he and his brother, Ambrose, and father John (the elder), stole eight pieces of cotton from a warehouse in Lancashire. John was sentenced seven years and his father and brother were both sentenced fourteen years. These documents also told me that William PARKER had been previously sentenced and transported to Van Diemen’s Land. I have evidence that John (the elder) arrived in New South Wales on 14 July 1835 onboard Mary Ann andJohn (the younger) and Ambrose arrived New South Wales on board John Barry on 21 September 1835, and evidence of all three receiving their ticket of leave[2].
  • Thomas Parker, a younger sibling of William PARKER, was also transported to Van Diemen’s Land. Thomas’ sentence was seven years and he arrived on board the Egyptian on 5August 1839. Records show he received his Ticket of Leave October 1843 and Certificate of Freedom in 1845. Thomas eventually made his way to New South Wales and found his brother Ambrose in Cowra, New South Wales. They were both shepherds on the same property in Cowra. I have evidence for Thomas and Ambrose being admitted to Cowra hospital in 1882 and 1884, respectively[3]

 

 

Repositories and Records that I Plan to Use:

  • Tasmanian Archives and Heritage Office:

Explore the online Convict Portal to get a better understanding of records that may assist me further with William PARKER’s life after his release.

  • State Records New South Wales:

Read the following Archive in Brief sheets to assist my search for William PARKER and his brother Thomas, entering New South Wales. Peruse Electoral Rolls for the brothers living in the vicinity of one another. Refer the Colonial Secretary’s papers for any mention of either father or sons that may give me a lead.

AIB No. 1 – Shipping and Arrival Records.

AIB No. 24 – Shipping and arrival records – additional sources.

AIB No. 5 – Electoral Rolls

AIB No. 104 How to search the Colonial Secretary’s papers 1788-1900.

  • New South Wales Birth, Death, and Marriage online database.

Search for and purchase a death of William PARKER within the area of Cowra, New South Wales

  • National Library of Australia Trove Newspaper online portal

Search newspaper articles for William PARKER residing at Jerulai n the Cowra, New South Wales district.

 

Reflective Statement:

Whilst evaluating the records I have used to date I have found that I have been very untidy in recording repositories and sources. This has made my research unreliable. This research plan has made me realize I must be thorough whilst collecting information I must become more methodical whilst researching, by planning ahead and compiling family group sheets, pedigree charts, timelines and recording where to search prior to carrying out further investigations.

I must learn to concentrate on one person at a time to avoid surfing the repositories and resources and becoming waylaid with collateral relatives. Although, in stating this, there have been times when I have had to research collateral relatives to get the next piece of the puzzle to allow me to continue to the next generation.

My work has been verified by way of starting with myself and working backward and finding the original records to further confirm that the person is the correct piece that fits the puzzle. I have always used the principle of sourcing, at least, two primary records and various secondary records to verify the person in question is, in fact, the correct person.I have always confirmed family history research that has been passed on to me rather than accepting it as accurate work and I have always shared my research with others, to assist with their research and hoping that it will further preserve my family history.

Copying and pasting information into my family tree records have been a bad habit in the past. This is an important lesson that I have learned through doing this course. Although I have been aware of copyright, plagiarism was not part of my vocabulary. I was aware of repositories, referencing, footnotes, endnotes, but citing sources using the correct method has been a difficult learning curve. In saying that, I know it will become second nature with practice and will also be beneficial to my work.

All of these lessons I have learned over the past weeks will improve my research skills and prevent me wasting precious time going over the same information I have sourced in the past.

The most difficult question in this course was where to look for the answer to my problem when I feel I exhausted repositories. But, I have come to realize that I have lacked in reading directive information within the repositories. Instead, I have just jumped in and searched names.  I will now go back and explore the Tasmanian LINC online convict portal and the Archives in Brief sheets before I continue with my search of William PARKER’s life after release.

My intention is to now complete a timeline of all the brothers in the hope that I can establish gaps within my research which in turn will give me a favorable outcome.

 

References:

  • Cowra Family History Group Library, Cowra District Hospital 1881-1884 Register LIN. HOSP. 2794.02 Thomas Parker May1882 and Ambrose Parker April 1884.

England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975, database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/: accessed 17 March 2016), John Parker, 19 July 1816, Burnley, Lancashire, England, reference; FHL microfilm 0093654, 0093664.

England Births and Christenings, 1538-1910, database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/: accessed 17 March 2016), William Parker, 20 January 1820, Christening, St Peter’s, Burnley, Lancashire, England, volume, Lancashire Record Office, Preston; FHL microfilm 1,517,690.

England Births and Christenings, 1538-1910, database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/: accessed 17 March 2016), Thomas Parker, 3 January 1825, Christening, St Peter’s, Burnley, Lancashire, England, volume, Lancashire Record Office, Preston; FHL microfilm 1,517,690.

  • Great Britain. Home Office, & State Library of Queensland. (1948). John Parker (the elder), one of 306 Convicts Transported on theMary Ann, 06 July 1835., Criminal: Convict transportation registers [HO 11].
  • Great Britain. Home Office, & State Library of Queensland. (1948). John Parker (the younger), one of 320 Convicts Transported on the John Barry, 07 September 1835., Criminal: Convict transportation registers [HO 11].
  • Great Britain. Home Office, & State Library of Queensland. (1948). Ambrose Parker, one of 320 Convicts Transported on the John Barry, 07 September 1835., Criminal: Convict transportation registers [HO11].
  • NLA Trove. http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8754164 Colonial Times (Hobart, Tas; 1828-1857), Tuesday 31 October 1843, p4. Ticket of Leave Thomas Parker,
  • NSW Death Certificate 1886/8039 District of Cowra Thomas Parker.
  • NSW Death Certificate 1890/4663 District of Cowra Ambrose Parker.
  • Society of Australian Genealogist. New South Wales Government Gazette 1832 – 1863 Transcriptions. Ticket of Leave, 16 December 1839, John Parker, Mary Ann (4)at Inverary.
  • Society of Australian Genealogist. New South Wales Government Gazette 1832 – 1863 Transcriptions. Ticket of Leave, 25 February 1840, John Parker (the younger), John Barry at Carcoar.
  • Society of Australian Genealogist. New South Wales Government Gazette 1832 – 1863 Transcriptions. Ticket of Leave, 14 August 1843, Ambrose Parker, John Barry at Muswellbrook.

SRNSW: Convict Records; Ref, NRS 12202, [4/4135] Reel 935, No. 39/2300 Principal Superintendent of Convicts, Ticket of Leave butts, 1839 – 1840 Mary Ann 4, John Parker.

SRNSW: Convict Records, Ref, NRS 12202, [4/4171] Reel 947, No. 43/71 Principal Superintendent of Convicts, Ticket of Leave butts, 1842- 1843 – John Barry, Ambrose Parker.

TAHO, CON14/1/51 Indent William Parker No. 1160 Aurora1835.

TAHO, CON18/1/7 p476 Thomas Parker No. 1520 Egyptian 1839.

TAHO, CON27/1/2 p15 Appropriation List William Parker No. 1160 Aurora1835.

TAHO, CON31/1/35 p 213 Convict Conduct Record William Parker Aurora1835.

TAHO, CON18/1/4 p115 Description List William Parker No. 1160 Aurora1835.

TAHO, CON31/1/36 p74 Conduct Record Thomas Parker No. 1520 Egyptian 1839.

TAHO, CON14/1/48 p23 Indent Record Thomas Parker No. 1520 Egyptian1839.

 

 

Appendix:

  1. a pedigree chart.
  2. a completed family group chart for the individual identified in the question.

 

 

NOTE: In March 2018 my sister and I visited Port Arthur.  We discovered that William was an inmate at the Children’s Prison, Point Puer.  I have submitted a request to have William’s records transcribed and am eagerly awaiting its arrival.

Stay Posted.

 

Time Flies!

Well, where has that time gone? We have achieved so much since my last post.

We sold our van, purchased a house in Tasmania,  I traveled to England and Scotland with a life-long friend. Sadly,  we lost my daughter-in-law to cancer, we sold the house in Tasmania and we are now living on the South Coast of NSW.

Do I have regrets?  Only one! I wish my daughter in law was still with us! Looking on the positive side, I am so grateful that she chose my son to be her husband and together they gave us two treasured little boys and many, many wonderful memories that I will take to my grave.  I could never have wished for a better daughter in law. Thanks, Shez.

So, after we reached Tasmania, we loved it so much we decided to sell the caravan and purchase a house. That house was just perfect! The only thing missing was my kids and grandkids. Eighteen months later a snap decision was made and here we are back in New South Wales.  Back with the most important possessions in the world…..our family.

While I was in Tasmania I began to study online with the University of Tasmania (UTAS). Diploma of Family History was my choice (of course).

I have been researching our family since 1981 and I thought I was well versed in research, after all those years. I was so wrong! I have learned so much.  I have one more unit to do and I will graduate.

Now, while I have been unpacking, I found my folders from Uni and I thought that I would like to preserve the stories I have written during my study. I was going to save them all in a file on my computer but I thought that they would eventually get lost. Then the lightbulb clicked and I recalled my WordPress Blog.  This is the place where I can save them and share with those who wish to read them………and I won’t lose them!

So my next few blogs will be my essays.  My last blog, being my niece’s wedding was part of my studies. I hope you enjoyed it. I enjoyed the wedding and the unit.

I hope you enjoy my stories.

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Our nomadic life was a great adventure that enriched our life so much. We met some wonderful people, although we may never see them again, they will be etched in our memories forever!

The beauty of Australia is never ending! The towns we visited were very welcoming, except for one, well life isn’t perfect, and we were not about to let that upset our experience.

We ventured on The Spirit of Tasmania to visit family and found that we felt very much at home on this little island.

So, almost twelve months later, here we are now Taswegian’s! The caravan has been sold, and we are once again homeowners and settled once again!

I have since signed up to the University of Tasmania (UTAS) studying for a Diploma of Family History and loving it! I have gained so much knowledge and can’t wait to unpack my mountains of family history paperwork and books, once again!.

So, from now I will be blogging about my daily/weekly happenings.

There will be a bit of family history, Tasmanian history, Town history and some ramblings of what is happening.

Success in Family History

My last blog was written about the Loss of the Montevideo Maru.

I blogged this information hoping it would reach someone who knew Toss’ brother Eric and his family.

Well, the blog worked and I have been contacted by Eric’s daughter and will meet with her next month.

Thanks WordPress!!!!

It is a shame that some people put their head in the sand and think that technology is just all too much.

What’s that saying???????  “We are never too old to learn!”

I watch my 20 month old grandson use his mothers’ ipad. So come on you old foggies, don’t let the kids walk all over you. Get your head out of the sand and have a go. It is really easier than you think and it is fun!

Happy Blogging.

My next blog will be one of my brick walls.

I’m still learning, so this may be a bit boring but we all have to start somewhere.

Life is beautiful!

Lost on the “Montevideo Maru”

Arthur Parker NX191449 (N108252) 1923-1942

Arthur “Toss” Parker was eighteen years and one month old on 4th April 1941 when he enlisted in WWII. He was too young to join the A.I.F., so he volunteered for the Anti Aircraft Anti Military Landing Craft Defence Force, Rabaul. After his compulsory training and pre-embarkation leave, he embarked on HMAT Neptuna on 7 August 1941 and disembarked Rabaul on 16 September 1941 along with two officers and fifty-two other comrades of his unit later known as A.A. Battery, Rabaul. These boys had been too young to be sent beyond the bounds of Australia with the regular army, but had been sent to the supposed safety of an Australian territory.
Once in Rabaul they took their gun position, with two 3-inch guns and obsolete ring-sight telescope, at Frisbee Ridge, silhouetted as it was against both north and southern skylines. For Rabaul lay in what was virtually a gigantic crater; only from this ridge could the guns command anything like the requisite 360 degrees angle of traverse. This position was also conspicuous from land, sea, and air.

After the outbreak of war in the Pacific began on 7th December 1941 when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbour, Malaya, and the Philippines with the Japanese already having bases in their Micronesian colonies, there was nothing between the Japanese and New Guinea. By January 1942, the Japanese had over 20,000 troops to the north of Australia – from Malaya and Singapore through Java, Ambon and Timor to New Guinea. With most trained units in the war against Germany, the Australians could do little to support the men in New Guinea facing the advancing Japanese.
On 4th January 1942, the Japanese dropped their first bombs on Rabaul and other raids followed. On 22nd January 120 Japanese aircraft attacked Rabaul. Both the bravery and the ineffectiveness of the Australian pilots in their Wirraway’s (normally used as trainers), against modern fighters were obvious. Heavy pre-invasion bombing continued on 23rd January. That night at 11.40pm the Japanese landed barges of 5,000 forces. As dawn broke, the Australians could see the harbour and the channel dense with Japanese shipping. Any sign of Australian resistance or movement attracted low-flying Japanese aircraft and naval fire. The Australians were told there would be no retreat. However, overwhelmed by numbers and firepower, group’s cut-off and communications breaking down, the order changed to ‘every man for himself’.
The Japanese gathered over 1,000 prisoners of war and civilian internees in Rabaul. Apart from knowing that Rabaul had ‘fallen’, the Australian public knew almost nothing of what happened in Rabaul. Then in April, newspapers began publishing reports from the men who had escaped.
These were alarming as they made public the killing of over 150 Australian prisoners of war at Tol plantation, south of Rabaul. Then the Australians were surprised when Japanese aircraft over Port Moresby dropped bundles of letters from prisoners in Rabaul. Most of the prisoners – including nurses and civilians – said ‘they were being treated reasonably’. The Australians now had contradictory information; some men were killed and because of a strange act of enemy chivalry, others were known to be alive. That was almost Australians were to know for another three years.
War reports state that on 22 June 1942, the civilian and military prisoners in Rabaul, except the officers and nurses, were loaded on the Montevideo Maru. Just before they left, they were able to tell the officers that they were on their way to Hainan Island. Off the Filipino coast near Luzon, early on the morning of 1 July, she encountered the torpedoes of the American submarine SS Sturgeon. Not one of the 845 prisoners of war or the 208 civilians survived. Most of the crew and guards reached the shore in the Philippines where Filipino guerrillas killed many. Only 3 Japanese guards and 17 crew had survived.
Japanese authorities received confirmation of the sinking of the Montevideo Maru early in 1943 but never advised Australian authorities. It was October 1945 when the translated nominal roll was received by the authorities in Canberra. Telegrams were sent to the families confirming the deaths of the men and boys from the 2/22nd Battalion, 1st Independent Company, the Fortress Artillery, Signals Units, Number 17 Anti-tank Battery, the Anti Aircraft Artillery, Number 19 Special Dental Unit, detachments from New Guinea Volunteer Rifles, 2/10 Field Ambulance, Ordnance Corps units, the 8th Division Supply Column, the Canteen Services Headquarters New Guinea Area, the Royal Australian Air Force, the Royal Australian Navy and Australian civilians.
By the end of October 1945 families of those named on the Montevideo Maru nominal roll received correspondence stating; “It is with deep regret that I have to inform you that the transmission of the nominal roll of the Japanese vessel Montevideo Maru which was lost with all personnel after leaving Rabaul in June 1942 shows that [name] was aboard the vessel and I desire to convey to you the profound sympathy of the Commonwealth Government for External Territories.”
It is unknown how Toss lost his life, whether he was one of those massacred at Tol Plantation, perished in the jungle of New Britain whilst trying to escape, or drowned due to the sinking of the Montevideo Maru. The nominal roll retrieved from Japan cannot be confirmed, as there are many discrepancies. Some families of civilians were told that their loved one was on the nominal roll but after returning to Rabaul and talking to their native friends they were told of his execution.
The sinking of the Montevideo Maru is the greatest single disaster suffered by Australian’s in World War II. However, until recently, it was rarely referred to on Anzac Day or other days of national remembering.
In at least two ABC TV presentations, it was stated that the tragic loss of HMAS Sydney, with the deaths of 635 Australian, was ‘the greatest single loss’ of the war. Family members who lost someone among the 1035 Australians who died when the Montevideo Maru sank feel, when they hear this, that their sense that no one has heard of this event has been confirmed yet again.
There is disappointment, frustration, and even anger that a situation that has had such a profound impact on their own families, and the families of more than one thousand other Australians should be unrecognised, forgotten, or ignored by most of their compatriots. They feel that they have not been included in Australian history and wonder why this should be so.
For those who have links with that community which was lost from the islands of New Guinea in 1942, there is a common desire to have the story made known to the wider public. In a speech in 1992, at a service of remembrance in New Britain to mark the 50th anniversary of the sinking of the Montevideo Maru, it was stated, ‘The history of those months deserves to be far better known.’
The majority of the ‘A A Battery, Rabual’ was young boys under the age of 20 years old. Their lives cut short! They never had the privilege of marrying and having a family of their own or to be reunited with their loved ones.
There was no confirmation of the names of those who lost their life.
After the events in Rabaul, it would more than 3 years before the family of those killed were to find out their fate. How tragic this must have been for all concerned. Not knowing whether their son, brother, father, uncle, grandchild was alive or dead!
During 2011 the “Rabaul and MVM Society” in Australia, were pro-active in seeking recognition for all those who lost their lives and constructed a Memorial in Canberra. Papua New Guinea’s Prime Minister Peter O’Neal contributed $100,000 towards a work, that will be constructed at the Memorial next year.
My role, as our family historian is to preserve Toss’ existence in our family history.
Arthur “Toss” PARKER’S parents were Arthur John PARKER and Rhoda Prudence ‘Winifred’ GREEN.
To my knowledge, Arthur and Winifred never married although through the Electoral Rolls I have found them living together 1930 and 1933 at 44 Selwyn Street, Paddington. After this date, they separated. Arthur was then living at 30 Bellevue Street Arncliffe with Alice’ Eva’ PARKER and Winifred is living at 32A Burton Street, Surry Hills. Although Winifred married Vladimir Faddeyeff in 1943, she continued to live at the same address until, according to the electoral roll, 1963. Toss had stated this address as his residence on his enlistment papers. Perhaps Winifred could not bear to leave her address in case Toss came home looking for her!

My mother, Joan Thomas, remembers the boys visiting their father and Eva at Arncliffe. She also recalls visiting Winifred. My grandmother, Margaret Thomas, Arthur’s sister, often visited Winifred who worked in a cake shop or cafeteria in Sydney.
Toss also had a brother Eric Parker who joined the forces on 5 January 1942, he was discharged 19 December 1945. Eric married Kathleen Little on 22 September 1945 at Auburn. I believe they had two daughters, Janette and Aileen. Eric and Kathleen divorced in October 1958.
Toss’ father died on 12th April 1946 aged 50 years, and I wonder if it was the stress and or the news of hearing that his son was never to return, caused his death!
Lest we forget!

Sources:
Selby, David. Hell And High Fever. 1956 Currawong Publishing Co. P/L. Sydney.
Alpin, Douglas. Rabaul 1942. 1994 Pacific Press. ISBN 1 875150 02 01
Reeson, Margaret. Whereabouts Unknown. 1993 Albatross Books. Sutherland ISBN 0 7324 1033 7
Reeson, Margaret. A Very Long War. 2000 Melbourne University Press ISBN 0 522 84909 1
Remembering The War In New Guinea
http://ajrp.awm.gov.au/AJRP/remember.nsf/Web-Frames/MapFrame?OpenDocument
Lost Lives-The Second World War and the islands of New Guinea
http://www.jje.info/lostlives/places/aamlcd.html
The Montevideo Maru. Lost at Sea, Lost from Australian History.
http://www.montevideomaru.org/history/history-montevideo-maru/the-montevideo-maru-lost-at-sea-lost-from-australian-history/
Statement by the Minister for Veterans’ Affairs and Minister for Defence Personnel, the Hon Alan Griffin, MP. Statement on the loss of the Montevideo Maru 21 June 2010
http://www.dva.gov.au/news_archive/Documents/maru.pdf

Hello world!

Welcome to my page.

What keeps me out of mischeif??? Family History.

I have been researching since 1981 and have met many wonderful people, some family, some researchers of no relation. Family historians are a different breed of people. We love to share our family history because our main aim is to preserve our history for our descendants.

You wont find all your family history on the internet. You may find a lot of indexes and other people’s research but you wont find many original documents and you must always verify other peoples research.

Every month I buy the Australian Family Tree Connection magazine. This month I found another person researching our Matthews Family. What a bonus!

My great grandfather, William Mathews was born in Baden, Germany in 1838, according to his marriage certificate. My aunty applied for this marriage certificate way back in 1978. It states that the marriage was solemnised at Bristane on 14 January 1876 between William Mathews (widow) and Sarah Curry (spinster) in the Wesleyan Parsonage Bowen Terrace according to the rites of the Wesleyan church. William was a watchmaker aged 38 years and lived in Brisbane. His father’s name was also William Mathews – watchmaker. Sarah was born at Ballyhalbert, Down, Ireland and was 21 years old and lived in Brisbane. Her parents were Edward Curry (labourer) and Jane Pack.

The person I have recently met told me that he too had the marriage certificate for William & Sarah. He purchased it in 2003 but has different information than that of the earlier certificate. WHAT!!!!!!!!!!!!

The certificate that he has is a scanned copy of the register and it states that William Matuist married Sarah Curry. There is also hadwriting in the margin that reads something like ‘was Matuist, now Mathews’…………………………for 25 years we have been mislead!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Perfect reason to share your information with other researchers, you will be the one to benefit providing you verify your research.

Happy researching.